Showing 31 of 186 search results for
Highlights
SEE ALSO
Category:Paintings
Date:1910s
Artist
Kurt Schwitters
1887 - 1948
Germany Das Arbeiterbild, 1919
Arbetarbilden
The Worker Picture
Collage with paper, wood and metal on panel
125 x 91 cm
Paintings
Donation 1964 from The Friends of Moderna Museet
NM 5863 This artwork is not on display
SAVE
- About the work

Das Arbeiterbild takes its title from the word "Arbeiter", which appears

in Kurt Schwitter’s large collage of wood, paper, and metal on panel.

Immediately after the First World War, Schwitters’ native Germany was

in chaos; he found the material for his works in Europe’s ruins and rubble.

Schwitters imbued the waste with new meaning, combining fragments

into collages of comical levity and astonishing beauty.

Kurt Schwitters used his found rubbish to build his own variety of

futurism and dada. On one occasion, he tore up a piece of stationery with

the word Commerzbank in the letterhead. The syllable "merz" was all

that remained, and he began calling his works Merzbilder. Merz was also

the name he gave his entire oeuvre. In his hometown of Hannover, he developed

these collages into a veritable Merzbau, a structure that eventually

grew into an infinite architecture of winding passages and rooms in the

family’s multi-storey home. The Second World War drove Schwitters out

of the country, however, first to Oslo and then to the UK, where he tried

resuming his building project in the same spirit of linguistic rebellion

and anti-hierarchical order as his early collages.

Kurt Schwitters was a multifaceted artist who began as a painter

but expanded his practice to poetry, drama, typography, architecture,

and acoustic experiments and performance. The large collage in the

Moderna Museet collection is a balanced composition in harmonious

colour chords, but its accentuation of "low" materials and its challenging

dimensions point directly towards the future.


Das Arbeiterbild takes its title from the word "Arbeiter", which appears

in Kurt Schwitter’s large collage of wood, paper, and metal on panel.

Immediately after the First World War, Schwitters’ native Germany was

in chaos; he found the material for his works in Europe’s ruins and rubble.

Schwitters imbued the waste with new meaning, combining fragments

into collages of comical levity and astonishing beauty.

Kurt Schwitters used his found rubbish to build his own variety of

futurism and dada. On one occasion, he tore up a piece of stationery with

the word Commerzbank in the letterhead. The syllable "merz" was all

that remained, and he began calling his works Merzbilder. Merz was also

the name he gave his entire oeuvre. In his hometown of Hannover, he developed

these collages into a veritable Merzbau, a structure that eventually

grew into an infinite architecture of winding passages and rooms in the

family’s multi-storey home. The Second World War drove Schwitters out

of the country, however, first to Oslo and then to the UK, where he tried

resuming his building project in the same spirit of linguistic rebellion

and anti-hierarchical order as his early collages.

Kurt Schwitters was a multifaceted artist who began as a painter

but expanded his practice to poetry, drama, typography, architecture,

and acoustic experiments and performance. The large collage in the

Moderna Museet collection is a balanced composition in harmonious

colour chords, but its accentuation of "low" materials and its challenging

dimensions point directly towards the future.


- Exhibition history
- Exhibition catalogues
- Bibliography
Showing 31 of 186 search results for
Highlights
Exit slideshow